Tag Archives: Shakespeare

To Thy Fair Flower Add the Rank Smell of Weeds

But why thy odour matcheth not thy show,
The solve is this, that thou dost common grow.

To Thy Fair Flower Add the Rank Smell of Weeds

Ugly-Pants Alert! Fair Flowers That Are Not Gather’d in Their Prime

Rot and consume themselves in little time.

Fair Flowers That Are Not Gather'd in Their Prime

Ugly-Pants Alert! The Not-So-Darling Buds of May

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more stinky and intemperate.

As it’s the beginning of May, I’ve decided to do Floral Patterns as our Theme of the Week.

The Not-So-Darling Buds of May

Ugly-Pants Alert! A Ho by Any Other Name

Would smell as stank.

Thanks go to Phil for the photo, title, and caption.

A Ho by Any Other Name

Ugly-Pants Alert! “Why Do You Show Me This?… Start, Eyes!”

What, will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?
—from Macbeth, Act IV, Scene I

At times like these, only the words of the Bard can adequately convey our horror. (Scroll down for side view.) This tragedy is our Specimen of the Week!

"Why Do You Show Me This?… Start, Eyes!" photo 1

"Why Do You Show Me This?… Start, Eyes!" photo 2

The Trappings and the Suits of Woe

Thou comest in such a questionable shape
That I will speak to thee: I’ll call thee Hipster.
—adapted from Hamlet, Act I, Scene IV

Scroll down for rear view. (Title of this post comes from Act I, Scene II.)

The Trappings and the Suits of Woe 1

The Trappings and the Suits of Woe 2

Good Prince Hal

I saw young Harry, with his beaver on,
His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm’d
Rise from the ground like feather’d Mercury,
And vaulted with such ease into his seat,
As if an angel dropp’d down from the clouds,
To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus
And witch the world with noble horsemanship.
—from Henry IV, Part I, Act IV, Scene I

Good Prince Hal